Museums are reassessing the legacy of Gauguin, who had sex with teenagers and treated Polynesians as savages

'Vahine No Te Vi' (Woman With a Sleeve), by French painter Paul Gauguin, on display at the National Gallery

'Vahine No Te Vi' (Woman With a Sleeve), by French painter Paul Gauguin, on display at the National Gallery in London

  |  Tolga Akmen/AFP

"Is it time to stop looking at Gauguin altogether?" That's the question visitors hear as they walk through the exhibition at the National Gallery in London.

"Is it time to stop looking at Gauguin altogether?" This is the startling question visitors hear on the audio guide as they walk through the 'Gauguin Portraits' exhibition at the National Gallery in London. The show, which runs through January 26, focuses on Paul Gauguin's depictions of himself, his friends and fellow artists, and of the children he fathered and the young girls he lived with in Tahiti.

The standout portrait in the exhibition is 'Tehamana Has Many Parents' (1893). It depicts Gauguin's teenage lover holding a fan.

Read more in Folha de S.Paulo

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